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Should You Pursue That New Social Media Platform?

Should You Pursue That New Social Media Platform?

The thing about social media is there are new platforms popping up every. single. day. And what works well for some associations, may not work well for others.

So how do you know which platforms your organization should be using? Three questions tell it all...

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What to do when a “Rival” Association Ends

Posted by Sarah Hill

Rival_Association

Let’s start out on a nice note: no associations are really “rivals” with one another. But occasionally interests overlap and you find yourself worried about competing calendars, sharing speakers, and overlapping (and occasionally overcommitted) members.

Sometimes those overlapping associations come apart due to any number of reasons. That leaves your association with some decisions to make. Here are some first steps when a “rival” association disbands.

Shake "Survivor's Guilt"

It can suddenly feel like you’re standing on very shaky ground when an association like yours just doesn’t make it. Why is yours okay? Suddenly the cracks are starting to show in your association’s infrastructure and you start to worry how long it’ll be before your association sees the same fate. Stop worrying. Look ahead. Get started.

Find our what you can about the other association

If you’re still worried, see what you can find out. What was the undoing of the other association? What were the members like? How were the events coordinated and executed? The best way to find out this information is to… 

Talk with your members

Many of them probably overlap or share projects or even offices. Politely ask what went on and some pros and cons from the now dissolved association. Discuss what people really loved about the association and what could have been improved.

See if there is an opportunity

Take that information and run with it! Be courteous and respectful for those friends and members who may miss the old organization, but definitely take lessons from the wins of the bygone association. Setting up a meet and greet with old members isn’t a bad idea, either. Encourage your members to reach out to their friends and invite them along to your next event!

Need help planning that event? We have a guide for you! Download it for free by clicking below today and make planning that next event a breeze.

Download our Event  Planning Guide for  Small Staff Associations

Topics: association management, small staff association, Small Staff Chatter

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