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Engaging First-Time Conference Attendees

Engaging First-Time Conference Attendees: 4 Tactics to Try

Of course you want to provide an exceptional experience for ALL of your conference attendees, but ensuring that happens for your first-time attendees is particularly important. Their decision to attend future events (and possibly even renew their membership) depends heavily on that first experience, so going the extra mile for those folks, in particular, is certainly worth it.

What does “going the extra mile” for your first-time attendees look like? Here are a few tactics worth trying:

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3 Fresh Content Ideas for Your Organization's Newsletter

Posted by Callie Walker

3 Fresh Newsletter Ideas to Try

Newsletters are great for engaging your organization’s membership. But in order for your newsletter to effectively do that, the content must be:

  1. Valuable
  2. Easily scannable (No one wants an overly-long email)
  3. Fresh

Now those first two are probably self-explanatory, but what about that last one? What do we mean by fresh?

Well, we mean new; different; out-of-the-box. Sure, some of your content will need to be repeated month to month (your upcoming events and featured content, for example), but when time and space permit, why not try something new?

In fact, here are three fresh content ideas to try out in your organization’s newsletter:

1. A “Tip of the Month”

Who doesn’t love a quick tip?! To add value to your newsletter, consider adding in a “Tip of the Month” section. (Or “Tip of the Week,” depending on the frequency of your newsletter.) Tips could include anything from industry and professional best practices to job hunting and interviewing advice.

This hits all three “content musts” on the head: It’s valuable, easily scannable, and likely something you haven’t done before - AKA fresh!

2. A “Dear Abby” style Q&A

Remember, the name of the game here - for your newsletter and your organization as a whole - is providing your members with value. And what could be more valuable than one-on-one professional advice?

Think of this like a mentorship, but for your entire membership. Encourage your members to submit questions (anonymously is fine), and then have someone from your staff - or an industry leader - address those questions.

To get this started, you may have to post a few seed questions, but if those questions (and answers) resonate with your members, they’ll likely want to submit questions of their own.

And bonus: Getting these types of questions directly from your members can help down the road when choosing conference speakers and/or webinar presenters. (A true way to “give the people what they want!”)

3. A recommendations section

Much of your newsletter will be about your organization - and that’s completely fine. But consider every now and then having a section spotlighting other companies, organizations, resources, etc. For example:

  • Social media accounts to follow
  • Industry blogs worth reading (in addition to your own, if you have one)
  • Apps to download (Even if it’s just a time management app)
  • Books to read (think summer reading)

Anything that might provide your members with value, consider adding it. And don’t forget to pay attention to click-through rates when trying out some of these content ideas. See what works and what doesn’t, and then make adjustments from there.

Want more tips for engaging your organization’s membership outside of your newsletter? Check out our free Small-Staff Guide to Member Engagement below!

Membership Engagement  A comprehensive guide to engaging your organization's membership Download this guide

Topics: member engagement, Small Staff Chatter

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